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January 2020

February 2020

Thank you London and good night!


Find Out What Madonna Thinks of Her Historic 50th Dance Club Songs No. 1

Queen of Pop Madonna also continues to be the Queen of Dance Clubs, as the superstar collects her landmark 50th No. 1 on Billboard's Dance Club Songs chart with "I Don't Search I Find."

"Dance is my first love," Madonna tells Billboard in an exclusive statement, "so every time one of my songs is celebrated in the clubs and recognized on the charts it feels like home!!"

"I never take the support of my fans for granted and it's always like the very first time."

With the new No. 1 (on the chart dated Feb. 22, which will post to Billboard's website on Feb. 19), Madonna becomes the first act ever to score as many as 50 No. 1s on any single Billboard chart, extending her record over George Strait, who has earned 44 leaders on Hot Country Songs.

Further, Madonna becomes the first act to have tallied at last one No. 1 on the Dance Club Songs chart in five separate decades, having collected leaders in the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, 2010s and now, in the 2020s.

The Dance Club Songs chart measures reports submitted by a national sample of club DJs, and which launched as national survey in the Billboard magazine issue dated Aug. 28, 1976. Madonna continues to have the most No. 1s on the list. She outpaces runner-up Rihanna, who has 33 No. 1s.

From Billboard.com


Madonna Achieves Milestone 50th No. 1 on Dance Club Songs Chart With 'I Don't Search I Find'

The Queen of Pop is the first act ever to score as many as 50 No. 1s on any single Billboard chart.

Madonna earns her record-extending, landmark 50th No. 1 on Billboard's Dance Club Songs chart, as "I Don't Search I Find" rises 2-1 on the Feb. 22-dated survey.

The chart, and all rankings dated Feb. 22, will refresh on Billboard.com on Wednesday, Feb. 19 (a day later than usual due to the Presidents' Day holiday in the U.S. on Monday, Feb. 17).

"Search" was remixed for clubs by, among others, Honey Dijon, Endor and DJLW.

With 50 No. 1s on Dance Club Songs, which measures reports submitted by a national sample of club DJs (and which launched as a national survey in the Billboard issue dated Aug. 28, 1976), Madonna outpaces runner-up Rihanna, who has notched 33 No. 1s. Beyoncé and Janet Jackson follow with 22 and 20 leaders, respectively.

With the coronation, Madonna additionally becomes the first act to have scored at least one No. 1 on Dance Club Songs in five separate decades, having tallied nine in the 1980s, 13 in the '90s, 18 in the 2000s, nine in the '10s and, now, one (so far) in the '20s.

Madonna is also the first act ever to score as many as 50 No. 1s on any single Billboard chart, extending her record over George Strait, who has earned 44 leaders on Hot Country Songs.

"Search" is the fourth Dance Club Songs leader from Madonna's album Madame X, which arrived as her ninth No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart in June 2019. It follows "Medellín," with Maluma (June 29), "I Rise" (Aug. 31) and "Crave," with Swae Lee (Nov. 16). The set is her first to generate four chart-topping hits since Confessions on a Dance Floor yielded a quartet in 2005-06: "Hung Up," "Sorry," "Get Together" and "Jump."

"Search" further marks Madonna's 10th consecutive Dance Club Songs No. 1, her longest such streak. (Katy Perry holds the record with 18 straight No. 1s in 2009-17.) Twice before, Madonna managed seven No. 1s in a row, first with "Causing a Commotion," from the Who's That Girl soundtrack (1987), through "Justify My Love," from her first greatest hits set, The Immaculate Collection (1991), and then with Ray of Light's "Nothing Really Matters" (1999) through Music's "Impressive Instant" (2001). Madonna's current run began with "Give Me All Your Luvin'," featuring Nicki Minaj and M.I.A., in 2012.

From Billboard.com


Madonna claims she was 'censored' after London Palladium show cut short

Madonna has claimed the London Palladium tried to "censor" her by cutting short a concert after she ran over her curfew on Wednesday.

The singer was performing her Madame X show when the lights and sound were switched off and the curtain closed as she went past her 23:00 GMT deadline.

Madonna shared a video on Instagram, which showed her trying to sing her final song in front of the curtain.

The Palladium had warned her not to break the strict curfew.

The pop superstar is in the middle of a residency at the venue.

She wrote: "It was 5 minutes past our 11:00 curfew, we had one more song to do and The Palladium decided to censor us by pulling down the metal fire curtain that weighs nine tonnes.

"Fortunately they stopped it half way and no one was hurt. Many thanks to the entire audience who did not move and never left us. Power to the people!!"

The venue denied that staff had used the fire curtain, but did not directly comment on the show being cut short.

"Contrary to a number of reports, at no point during last night's performance did staff at The London Palladium pull down, or attempt to pull down, the Iron Fire Curtain," a spokesman said.

The video footage appeared to confirm that it was the main cloth curtains which were used closed, rather than the iron fire curtain.

Madonna emerged from the closed curtain with her backing dancers as the crowd chanted her name. She performed her final song, I Rise, with the house lights turned up and her microphone switched off.

"I've been warned by Westminster council," she told the audience during the first night at the London venue last week, adding that she knew an "iron curtain" would fall over the production if she ran late.

Previous shows in the US have run considerably later than the London dates, with fans often kept waiting for several hours.

One fan wrote on Twitter: "Madonna just got cut off mid song by the Palladium curtain dropping and the lights coming up as she overran the curfew. Glorious moment. She finished the show a cappella in front of the curtain like a champ!"

Another said: "So not only did we finally see the utterly iconic Madonna live but she missed the curfew and the Palladium shut the lights and sound off. As the curtains fell, Madonna and her dancers stormed back onto the stage and sang I Rise a cappella backed by the audience."

From BBC News


Madame X Polaroid

Caroline was one of two fans who got Madonna's polaroid picture on Thursday night at the London Palladium. Madonna took one picture but the polaroid flew off behind her, then she took another (but thought it wasn't too good), so took a third picture!


Madonna: Will Gompertz reviews the star's show at the London Palladium ★★★★★

"She is here, isn't she Will?", asked a worried looking man at the London Palladium at about 20:00 on Wednesday night. "Yes", I said. I didn't actually know for sure, but he looked so anxious I thought a bit of reassurance wouldn't go amiss.

Anyway, the merch counter had just fallen over and there was a rising sense of calamity which didn't need adding to.

Madonna goes deep with her fans. The connection is genuine and mutual. Nobody blames her for cancelling shows due to extreme pain in her knees and hips, people just hope it's not on their night (she has subsequently ruled out shows on 4 and 11 February).

"I feel so guilty," another fan told me. "My mates had tickets for Monday night, which was cancelled and I've just sent a WhatsApp of my seat tonight."

"Where are you sitting?" I asked

"Row U in the stalls," he said

"How much did you pay?"

"£250" he said "Not bad eh? I think it's going to be great."

And it was - 5-star great.

It was perfectly imperfect, like one of those sketchy landscapes by Cezanne where you can see his underdrawings and misplaced lines, making it so much more beautiful and real than Canaletto's soulless precision.

Truth is the point of art, not perfection.

Not because the show was perfect, though. Madonna's movement was visibly stiff, lighting errors left dancers in the dark, and some of her banter fell flat. All of which only added to the "live-ness" of the event, which was more an evening of intimate cabaret than a stadium blockbuster show.

To read the rest of the review visit: www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment