Geena Davis spills 'League of Their Own' secrets on 25th anniversary

A League of Their Own has earned its place as one of America’s best sports comedies, selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress in 2012.

As the film celebrates its 25th anniversary on July 1 (with a new special edition Blu-ray out now), Davis recounts her memories from the League set.

Madonna was a question mark: Davis admits she wasn’t sure what it would be like to work with Madonna, then in her prime.

'She was Madonna. We wondered if we were going to be able to talk to her. Was she going to have an entourage? Were they going to put up walls around her where she stands?' Davis recalls.

Ultimately, Madonna was a team player who trained hard and insisted on sliding head-first into bases. 'That was painful. But she was so game. She was a trooper,' says Davis.

From USA Today


Madonna over Manhattan

Earlier this week, Harper's Bazaar lit up the NYC skyline in honor of their 150th anniversary, projecting a retrospective of some of the magazine's most memorable images on the Empire State Building. Including pictures of Madonna. #BAZAAR150

'Cool projection on Empire State Building last night! 🎉🎉🎉 N.Y.C. 🎩🎭🗽💘💘 Harper's Bazaar'

Instagram_harpersnyc1

'Its my city baby!! 🍎The Big Apple. 🗽🗽Start spreading the news!🎉💘😂#Bazaar150 🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉'

Instagram_harpersnyc2

Strike a Pose screening in London

UNICORN NIGHTS are bringing STRIKE A POSE to London's Prince Charles Cinema.

Last year, Unicorn Nights hosted two very successful screenings of the iconic film 'IN BED WITH MADONNA' [aka 'MADONNA : TRUTH OR DARE'], which detailed the pop singer's controversial Blond Ambition Tour. The film gave us to a glimpse into the lives of her seven backup dancers, who arguably stole the show.

25 years later, they are back and in STRIKE A POSE, the dancers are here to tell their side of the story. Tackling many of the controversial topics raised during and after the tour, the dancers reveal their struggle with acceptance and continue to show the world how to express themselves!

Unicorn Nights presents
STRIKE A POSE
Monday 24th April 20:45

To buy tickets visit www.princecharlescinema.com


Why Madonna is drinking in the Pepsi controversy

Madonna knows a little something about pulled Pepsi ads.

In 1989, she starred in a Pepsi commercial that was pulled because of controversy over the music video for 'Like a Prayer,' which featured burning crosses and showed Madonna kissing a black actor portraying a saint.

She reminded the world of this bit of pop culture history Wednesday when she posted on Instagram about the disastrous Pepsi ad featuring Kendall Jenner.

'When you wake up and realize that S*** just really doesn't make sense,' Madonna wrote in her caption. 'Side Note: My Pepsi commercial was pulled 30 years ago because I was kissing a black saint! #ironic.'

In the Kendall Jenner ad, Jenner ditches a photo shoot to join a street protest, then offers a Pepsi to a stoic police officer. Pepsi withdrew it after immediate criticism that the spot was appropriating the Black Lives Matter movement to sell soda.

Madonna was paid $5 million for her Pepsi commercial, which aired on March 2, 1989, during NBC's 'The Cosby Show.' The problem came the next day, when the music video premiered for 'Like a Prayer.' The video included stigmata and other religious imagery.

Pepsi spokesman said at the time: 'When you've got an ad that confuses people or concerns people, it just makes sense that that ad goes away.'

These days Madonna is making her loyalties known: On Wednesday, she posted a picture of herself strolling with a can of Coke.

It was the kind of shade Madonna fans thirst for.

From CNN.com


'Strike a Pose' documentary to show in Detroit Freep Film Festival

They are the simplest of documentary conceits: Where are they now? What happened to them then? These are the two questions that 'Strike a Pose,' a documentary that focuses on Madonna’s 1990 'Blond Ambition World Tour' dancers, spends 83 minutes answering.

We know what happened to Madonna, who never left the limelight. But her coterie of male dancers - who worked so closely with her that the then-childless Madonna was like a mother to them - seemingly disappeared into the wind after a brief flurry of fame. The film is a role reversal, with six of the seven dancers (the last is shown through archival footage and family interviews) front and center on screen, while the Material Girl is a ghostly presence, seen in some clips but no recent footage. That was a conscious choice on the part of co-directors Reijer Zwaan and Ester Gould.

'We realized that whatever she would say, or if she would even appear, even if we wouldn’t want to, the film would shift towards her. Because she’s an attention-grabber. We didn’t want that to happen. It would be so much different,' says Zwaan. 'There wouldn’t be this freedom and there wouldn’t be this space for them to connect with each other, because they would connect to her.'

Instead, Zwaan and Gould focused on recruiting the dancers who brought the underground dance art of vogue to the MTV-watching masses and a provided a groundbreaking example for the gay rights movement.

'We wrote them all carefully written letters in which we explained what we set out to do. That we wanted to make a film about them and their lives and their experiences, and that this wouldn’t be a film about Madonna, but a film about what that special period of time had meant to them but also to a lot of other people. And also because of the AIDS epidemic in the early '90s, it was just a moment in time where it all happened together, and they became such an iconic group of people,' says Zwaan.

Most of the dancers came on board right away, but a few were skeptical of the Dutch filmmakers’ intentions. In the aftermath of 'Madonna: Truth or Dare,' the 1991 black-and-white documentary that followed them on the 'Blond Ambition' tour, several of the dancers sued Madonna over invasion of privacy; others didn’t want to be the subject of a modern gossip flick. But Zwaan and Gould won them over, and always had in mind a film that focused more broadly on contextualizing the men within the times.

For the rest of the article and to buy tickets to the film/events visit: www.freep.com

'Strike a Pose'
7:30 p.m. Sat 01 April., Detroit Film Theatre at the Detroit Institute of Arts.
4 p.m. Sun 02 Apr., Emagine Royal Oak.

After the films: On Saturday, Jose Gutierez Xtravaganza talks to the Free Press’ Ashley Woods, and demonstrates voguing. On Sunday, he chats with Free Press style columnist Georgea Kovanis.

Voguing Workshop With Jose Xtravaganza
1 p.m. Sun 02 Apr.
Boll YMCA, 1401 Broadway St., Detroit.
$25.

Says Extravaganza about the workshop: 'Know that there’s no experience necessary. We’re going to find your inner performance artist. Everyone has one. You don’t need a technique because voguing is a feeling. It’s not something where you need to study 12 years of professional ballet or anything. It was created out of emotion and out of movement and out of feeling, and we all have that.'